Art

MCC Artists

Art lovers can celebrate a new addition to Nashville’s already rich artistic environment. The Music City Center is proud to be the home of over 100 pieces of public art. During the master planning process, the Convention Center Authority budgeted $2 million for art in the new convention center and worked with an art committee, consisting of art professionals and Nashville citizens, to select the pieces for the building. Over 225 artists submitted applications and the pieces that were chosen feature a broad spectrum of artistic media, including paintings, suspended pieces, new media, mosaics, and light works. Of the 52 artists represented in the acquired art collection, 32 of from Davidson County. Another 16 are from other parts of Tennessee, and the remaining four are from Georgia and Kentucky. The art committee also chose to commission eight site-specific, monumental pieces and two of these pieces came from local artists, Jamaal Sheats and Alicia Henry.
 

 

UNCONVENTIONAL – Nashville’s Music City Center is a stunning publication documenting the extraordinary artwork found throughout the new convention center. Striking photography and informative essays catalog the impressive collection of public art and how it complements the iconic architecture of the facility. The commemorative 12” x 12” art book is available to order. Click here for an order form.
 
Bruce Peebles
Galaticor
Wood, composite resin and chroma base paint

From 1986 to 2001, my work largely reflected my passion for the human form, employed with an abstractionist's simplicity of vision.  Wood was my preferred medium.

In my modular wall sculptures, I take inspiration from the outward appearance of landscapes and also contemporary architecture.  Recognizing the internal geometry of nature in my work gives the viewer a sense of the familiar.  Everyone relates to form, simplicity and order on some primal level.  The incorporation of negative space as part of the sculpture only adds to this interplay between the art and the viewer.  Some of these works elicit a kinetic effect in the mind of the viewer, thus they engage with the sculpture, and in this way, I communicate with the viewer.

I want to continue this conversation in my newest works, the “Antikythera Series.”  Here, the movement is choreographed through the use of robotics, and computers.  This then, is the evolution of my work, and the realization of an idea that I’ve had for nearly a decade to bring actual movement into my sculptures.

Bruce Peebles lives in Nashville, Tennessee with his wife and two sons.

Bruce Peebles and Sean Schaffer
Double Helix
MDF, chroma base paint

From 1986 to 2001, my work largely reflected my passion for the human form, employed with an abstractionist's simplicity of vision.  Wood was my preferred medium.

In my modular wall sculptures, I take inspiration from the outward appearance of landscapes and also contemporary architecture.  Recognizing the internal geometry of nature in my work gives the viewer a sense of the familiar.  Everyone relates to form, simplicity and order on some primal level.  The incorporation of negative space as part of the sculpture only adds to this interplay between the art and the viewer.  Some of these works elicit a kinetic effect in the mind of the viewer, thus they engage with the sculpture, and in this way, I communicate with the viewer.

I want to continue this conversation in my newest works, the “Antikythera Series.”  Here, the movement is choreographed through the use of robotics, and computers.  This then, is the evolution of my work, and the realization of an idea that I’ve had for nearly a decade to bring actual movement into my sculptures.

Bruce Peebles lives in Nashville, Tennessee with his wife and two sons.

Brad Sells
Rachel's Garden: Hermitage Series #51
Sugar maple burl

A tree is a selfless mentor inspiring me to reveal its beauty, its truth.  It feels right to work it.  It feels bigger than me.  It humbles me with its soulful, timely patience, thriving and dying at the same time.  The tree gives me a feeling of connection, gentle and real.  I learn from the revealing mortal grain.  This is my sculptural journey.  Carving wood is in my genetic make-up.

I appreciate the relationship between man and tree.  There is a co-evolution present.  I am interested in how man uses the forest and how the relationship grows and thrives in worldly cultures.  My curiosity has taken me as far as South Africa, the Amazon, and the Hawaiian Islands where indigenous people believe the forest is a spiritual place where ancestors dwell.

My work is an experiment in form and aesthetic.  I try to design consistently with the flow of life, a repetitive design of nature bursting with cycles and revolutions.  My process is hard and all consuming, like tending a crop.  The results reveal the tree’s character and spirit.  My work is an observation of science and nature disguised by soul philosophy.  I work between these realms creating art and hoping to form a sense of connection that is necessary and lasting.

 

Brad Sells
Mother's Harmony
Red maple burl

A tree is a selfless mentor inspiring me to reveal its beauty, its truth.  It feels right to work it.  It feels bigger than me.  It humbles me with its soulful, timely patience, thriving and dying at the same time.  The tree gives me a feeling of connection, gentle and real.  I learn from the revealing mortal grain.  This is my sculptural journey.  Carving wood is in my genetic make-up.

I appreciate the relationship between man and tree.  There is a co-evolution present.  I am interested in how man uses the forest and how the relationship grows and thrives in worldly cultures.  My curiosity has taken me as far as South Africa, the Amazon, and the Hawaiian Islands where indigenous people believe the forest is a spiritual place where ancestors dwell.

My work is an experiment in form and aesthetic.  I try to design consistently with the flow of life, a repetitive design of nature bursting with cycles and revolutions.  My process is hard and all consuming, like tending a crop.  The results reveal the tree’s character and spirit.  My work is an observation of science and nature disguised by soul philosophy.  I work between these realms creating art and hoping to form a sense of connection that is necessary and lasting.

Natalie Dunham
No. 11.2138.55_S[2]
Wood shims and hardware

Natalie Dunham was born in Riverside, California in 1985.  Dunham received her BFA in painting from Birmingham-Southern College in Birmingham, AL and her MFA in sculpture from the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD.

Jared Small
True Blues
Oil on canvas

Jared Small grew up in Memphis.  He’s familiar with decaying homes and neighborhoods -- they fascinate him.  He paints those structures (showing the rotting paint, sagging rooflines, and broken windows) in a heartily realistic manner that dissolves into abstraction as it eases toward the edges of his paintings on panel.

In an article in the Memphis Commercial Appeal, Andria Lisle describes Small’s captivating approach as similar to the mysterious obsession with the vernacular of the South.  She writes, “Small’s impetus to find beauty in the dilapidation is, likewise, a purely Southern sentiment that’s most often manifested in photographs of kudzu-overtaken barns and rusted tractors.”
Keen observation is Small’s greatest talent.  His ability to believably detail what he sees is clearly evident in his portraiture.  Whether a worldly octogenarian or a child on the cusp of adolescence, Small captures each individual’s zeal.  He expresses his practice as, “…trying to accomplish a dream-like state…I’m imagining other people’s memories – fading, but still there.”
 

Carrie McGhee
Purple Heart
Rust, oil and metal leaf on transparent acrylic

Carrie McGhee has lived in many parts of the United States, having migrated from Cincinnati to Los Angeles, New York and finally, Nashville. She has worked in historic buildings as a conservation painter and as a scenic painter for a variety of films and sets. McGee received a Visual Arts Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts/Southern Arts Federation, as well as a residency fellowship from the Christoph Merian Foundation in Basel, Switzerland. Her paintings and constructions have been exhibited regularly for over twenty years. McGee’s mixed media constructions explore variation within repeated forms. Utilizing transparent plastics as a ground, she experiments with natural and chemical processes, such as rust and oxidation, to create luminous works that emanate a meditative pulse.

 

McGhee’s investigations developed on the periphery of her work as an abstract painter. In the midst of a studio move she discovered a sheet of vinyl containing a multi-layered pattern of rust spheres, the result of a slow ceiling leak. The illuminated metal impressions were unexpectedly beautiful, and possessed a combination of organic and industrial qualities McGee sought in her paintings. Initially experienced as a playful experimentation, this work became the central focus of McGee’s efforts, and soon evolved from ephemeral to lasting and architectural in scope.

Mark Bradley-Shoup
Disscetion of Maps 1, 2, 3, & 4
Oil on panel

Mark Bradley-Shoup earned his BFA from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in Painting and Drawing and his MFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Studio Art. Bradley-Shoup produces meticulously crafted paintings and works on paper based in part on his own manipulated photographs of both urban and rural environments. He employs extensive use of masking tape, rules and x-acto blades to generate precise areas of paint that emphasize the surface texture of his compositions in a way that undermines any elements of photorealist illusion. Prevalent themes in his work include “consumption and growth,” “expansion and recession,” and “the elegance of brutality.” He has worked with various non-profit agencies and educational institutions including the Hunter Museum of American Art, the Association for Visual Arts, Allied Arts of Greater Chattanooga, the Creative Discovery Museum, Chattanooga Parks, Recreation, Arts and Culture, and the Chattanooga School for Arts and Sciences. Currently, Bradley-Shoup is based in Chattanooga and is a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga.

Bruce Cain
Elevated Photo of Lower Broad at Night
Archival pigment print on canvas

Bruce Cain lives in Mount Juliet, Tennessee and owns Elevated Lens Photography. Elevated Lens provides photography services for architects, engineers, contractors, developers and real estate professionals in the Middle Tennessee area. Cain specializes in ground-based, low altitude aerial photography, using a custom made vehicle mounted pneumatic mast that lets him put the camera up to 65 feet in the air, while he controls it from his truck. The system enables him to give his clients a unique aerial perspective that cannot be accomplished using conventional aerial photography methods. Also, since the system is ground-based, he can shoot both aerial views and a ground level views in one visit.

Bruce Cain
Nashville Skyline from Gateway Bridge
Archival pigment print on canvas

Bruce Cain lives in Mount Juliet, Tennessee and owns Elevated Lens Photography. Elevated Lens provides photography services for architects, engineers, contractors, developers and real estate professionals in the Middle Tennessee area. Cain specializes in ground-based, low altitude aerial photography, using a custom made vehicle mounted pneumatic mast that lets him put the camera up to 65 feet in the air, while he controls it from his truck. The system enables him to give his clients a unique aerial perspective that cannot be accomplished using conventional aerial photography methods. Also, since the system is ground-based, he can shoot both aerial views and a ground level views in one visit.

Bruce Cain
Nashville Skyline from Rose Park
Chroma luxe print on aluminum

Bruce Cain lives in Mount Juliet, Tennessee and owns Elevated Lens Photography. Elevated Lens provides photography services for architects, engineers, contractors, developers and real estate professionals in the Middle Tennessee area. Cain specializes in ground-based, low altitude aerial photography, using a custom made vehicle mounted pneumatic mast that lets him put the camera up to 65 feet in the air, while he controls it from his truck. The system enables him to give his clients a unique aerial perspective that cannot be accomplished using conventional aerial photography methods. Also, since the system is ground-based, he can shoot both aerial views and a ground level views in one visit.

Bruce Cain
Sunrise over the Cumberland River

Bruce Cain lives in Mount Juliet, Tennessee and owns Elevated Lens Photography. Elevated Lens provides photography services for architects, engineers, contractors, developers and real estate professionals in the Middle Tennessee area. Cain specializes in ground-based, low altitude aerial photography, using a custom made vehicle mounted pneumatic mast that lets him put the camera up to 65 feet in the air, while he controls it from his truck. The system enables him to give his clients a unique aerial perspective that cannot be accomplished using conventional aerial photography methods. Also, since the system is ground-based, he can shoot both aerial views and a ground level views in one visit.

 

Bruce Cain
Nashville Skyline from Bicentennial Mall

Bruce Cain lives in Mount Juliet, Tennessee and owns Elevated Lens Photography. Elevated Lens provides photography services for architects, engineers, contractors, developers and real estate professionals in the Middle Tennessee area. Cain specializes in ground-based, low altitude aerial photography, using a custom made vehicle mounted pneumatic mast that lets him put the camera up to 65 feet in the air, while he controls it from his truck. The system enables him to give his clients a unique aerial perspective that cannot be accomplished using conventional aerial photography methods. Also, since the system is ground-based, he can shoot both aerial views and a ground level views in one visit.

Bruce Cain
Sunset at Percy Priest Lake
Archival pigment print

Bruce Cain lives in Mount Juliet, Tennessee and owns Elevated Lens Photography. Elevated Lens provides photography services for architects, engineers, contractors, developers and real estate professionals in the Middle Tennessee area. Cain specializes in ground-based, low altitude aerial photography, using a custom made vehicle mounted pneumatic mast that lets him put the camera up to 65 feet in the air, while he controls it from his truck. The system enables him to give his clients a unique aerial perspective that cannot be accomplished using conventional aerial photography methods. Also, since the system is ground-based, he can shoot both aerial views and a ground level views in one visit.

Bruce Cain
Self Portrait at Percy Priest Lake
Archival pigment print

Bruce Cain lives in Mount Juliet, Tennessee and owns Elevated Lens Photography. Elevated Lens provides photography services for architects, engineers, contractors, developers and real estate professionals in the Middle Tennessee area. Cain specializes in ground-based, low altitude aerial photography, using a custom made vehicle mounted pneumatic mast that lets him put the camera up to 65 feet in the air, while he controls it from his truck. The system enables him to give his clients a unique aerial perspective that cannot be accomplished using conventional aerial photography methods. Also, since the system is ground-based, he can shoot both aerial views and a ground level views in one visit.

 

James Threalkill
Jazz Intensity
Acrylic on canvas

The inspiration behind Jazz Intensity comes from my admiration for the creative spontaneity of jazz musicians and their relationship with their chosen instruments.  The vibrancy and intensity that they put into their performances makes for intriguing subject matter to capture on canvas. 

James is a native of Nashville, Tennessee and has been painting for more than 40 years.  He won an Emmy Award for Set Design in 1994 for a mural project coordinated with inner-city youth for the Viacom Network.  He traveled to Soweto, South Africa in 1995 to create a mural to pay tribute to South African freedom organizers.  He visited with President Nelson Mandela during that journey.  In the spring of 2011, he spent a month working in an artists’ residency program in Colombia, South America to motivate and empower the Afro Colombian community.  James is currently serving as the National Diversity Director for Skanska USA.

Jerry Atnip
The Hermitage – Kitchen
Archival pigment print

 

Jerry Atnip has a 36-year career as a commercial and fine art photographer.  He began as Partner and Creative Director of an ad agency in Nashville as well as Director of its photography department.  His images have been published in 40 countries, and since 2003, he’s held over 75 exhibitions and been presented with over 90 awards.  He is also a teacher, workshop director, curator, juror and frequent lecturer.  He is on the boards of several arts and photography organizations.

 

His work has been collected by museums, corporate and private collectors, and he is an Exhibiting Member of The National Arts Club in New York.  Those who have curated his work include Carol McCusker, Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, CA, Hossein Farmani, Founder of the Lucie Awards, Cig Harvey, Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University, Mac Holbert, co-founder of Nash Editions, Eli Reed, Magnum photographer, Julian Cox, Curator of deYoung Museum in San Francisco, Peter MacGill, President of Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York, Joyce Tenneson, photographer and Jane Jackson, Curator of the Sir Elton John Photography Collection. 

 

Corporate Collectors include Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Vanderbilt University, Hungarian Multicultural Center, Shepherd Center-Atlanta, Georgia, Avenue Bank, Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC, Vanderbilt Hospital, Tennessee Bank & Trust, DIGIfoto-Czech Republic and ABC’s Nashville television series.

 

Selected exhibitions include Art of Photography Show, San Diego, California, National Exhibition at Marin Museum of Contemporary Art, Novato, California, Emirates Photography Exhibition, Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture & Heritage, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Px3, Prix de la Photographie Paris, Paris, France, Basundhara Arts Festival, Basundhara, Kathmandu, Miniatures, Albuquerque Museum of Art, Spectra Triennial at Silvermine Guild Arts Center, New Canaan, Connecticut,  DIGIfoto Exhibition, Brno and Prague, Czech Republic, International Exhibition at Hungarian Multicultural Center, Budapest, Hungary, The Fourth Annuale Exhibition at Light Factory Museum of Contemporary Photography, Charlotte, North Carolina and 2012 Juried Exhibition at Center for Photographic Art, Carmel, California.

 

His first book, Gone South was published in 2011.  The Guitar: An American Love Story was published in 2012 in collaboration with the Tennessee State Museum.

 

His work has been featured in articles by Elizabeth Avedon, John Bennette, CNN Photo blog, La Journal de la Photographie, The Photo Review, pdn magazine, Silvershotz magazine, Photographers Forum magazine, PhotoLife magazine, South by Southeast magazine, Folly magazine, Lenscratch magazine, Nashville Arts Magazine, Photo-Eye, ArtNowNashville and John Wall’s Southern Photography.

Caroline Allison
Twitty City
Archival pigment print

 

This photograph was taken at the former Conway Twitty Mansion in Hendersonville, TN.  The space is currently owned by Trinity Broadcasting Network and is the site of their annual Christmas television special.

 

Caroline Allison was born and raised in Atlanta, GA.  She received her BA from the University of the South in Sewanee, TN and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Her photographs have been exhibited both nationally and internationally including exhibitions at the Bronx Museum of Art, Chicago Cultural Center, and Momentum Art in Berlin.  Her work has been included in group exhibitions at Howard Greenberg Gallery, Apex Art, Lehmann Maupin, and Jack the Pelican in New York.  She was the recipient of a Bronx Museum AIM fellowship and was artist in residence for the Amt fur Wissenschaft und Kunst in Frankfurt, Germany.  In 2009 she represented Tennessee in The 50 States Project, an online exhibition organized by British curator Stuart Pilkington, and was a 2010 nominee for the Baum Foundation Award.  She currently lives in Nashville with her husband and child.

Caroline Allison
Helen Keller Home, Tuscumbia, Alabama
Archival pigment print

This photograph was taken in Tuscumbia, Alabama, at the cottage shared by Helen Keller and her teacher, and lifelong companion, Annie Sullivan.

Caroline Allison was born and raised in Atlanta, GA.  She received her BA from the University of the South in Sewanee, TN and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Her photographs have been exhibited both nationally and internationally including exhibitions at the Bronx Museum of Art, Chicago Cultural Center, and Momentum Art in Berlin.  Her work has been included in group exhibitions at Howard Greenberg Gallery, Apex Art, Lehmann Maupin, and Jack the Pelican in New York.  She was the recipient of a Bronx Museum AIM fellowship and was artist in residence for the Amt fur Wissenschaft und Kunst in Frankfurt, Germany.  In 2009 she represented Tennessee in The 50 States Project, an online exhibition organized by British curator Stuart Pilkington, and was a 2010 nominee for the Baum Foundation Award.  She currently lives in Nashville with her husband and child.

Victoria Boone
Clouds
Mixed media on canvas

Victoria Boone began inventing symbols at the age of 16.   She used symbols to represent people and places.  By the age of 20, these symbols represented secret places and lovers.  Studying art history and studio art at the University of Alabama, her private semiology began incorporating hieroglyphics and pictographs in her paintings.  Since then, she has developed her symbols to include Native American, Hindi in Devanagari script, and Chinese hieroglyphics.  Boone currently has over 300 personal symbols representing artists, businesses, locations, family and friends.  Boone’s paintings are even more valued because of her personal symbols that document passionate love stories.

In addition, Boone adds “My series of paintings is a reflection of the String Theory.  This physics theory examines the idea that all matter is made from vibrating strands (called strings).  This theory is a theory of UNIFICATION.  It summaries my belief that all life is interconnected—a reason I use symbols from many cultures, including my own made up language.”

Jane Braddock
Apollo Artemis Zeus
Metallic leaf and acrylic on canvas

I paint intuitively, and afterwards – based on style, color and FEEL – the title emerges.


Artemis looks strong, feminine, regal and complex.  As the chaste goddess of the hunt, equipped with her quiver of golden arrows, she holds the central position in this triptych.  Her twin brother Apollo is the oracular god of intellect and in time began to supplant Helios as the god of light.  The geometry and brilliance of this painting looks almost like a literal, if abstract, representation of Apollo.  Zeus, their father, is the king of the Greek gods.  It just happened that this canvas – with the dark wash – looked like the older source material for this progeny.

I love that the Music City Center chose these paintings, as Nashville is known as the Athens of the South.  It is my honor and pleasure to make a small contribution to that legacy.

Born in 1946 in Richmond, Indiana, Jane Braddock currently lives in Nashville.  Reflecting her interests in Eastern spirituality and metaphysics, Braddock's abstract paintings present both the visual expressions of physical experience and the artist's attempt to capture an inner reality beneath sensorial appearances. Bio from Facing South- Portraits of Southern Artists, by Jerry Siegel

Charles Brindley
The Fractured Wall
Oil on canvas

The reference for The Fractured Wall is from a section of an old brick building that was on First Avenue, just north of Nashville.  Brindley created and worked on the painting over a four year period based on drawing studies done in the early 90’s.  Characteristic of many of Brindley's works, the brick wall is close and parallel with the picture plane.  The placement of the wall obscures the viewer’s sense of space beyond the foreground, inhibiting any forceful movement into depth.  The viewer's perspective of the painting is from below looking up from the left side of the canvas.  Set against a stark white sky, the linear brick and mortar lines are described with an atmospheric perspective overlay that supports the interesting and dynamic foreground space of the image.

Charles Brindley lives and maintains a studio in Adairville, a small community 35 miles north of Nashville, Tennessee.  He has been represented by galleries in numerous cities, including Nashville, Memphis, Taos, Washington, DC and New York City.  His work appears in public and corporate collections throughout the United States and in private collections internationally.  Five touring exhibitions of Brindley’s works have travelled to museums and art centers in the Southeast and Midwest.

 

There have been two major retrospectives of the artist’s career.  In 1998 the Tennessee State Museum presented Landscape Vision: Works of Charles Brindley 1980-1997, and in 2007 the Evansville Museum organized an exhibit of his work spanning a twenty year period.  Far Hills, Images of the Tennessee Residence, an exhibit of commissioned drawings and paintings of the historic mansion of Tennessee’s Governors completed a schedule of eight venues throughout the state in 2006.

 

Charles Brindley’s drawings and paintings depict a variety of symbol-laden subjects, including giant deciduous trees, panoramic landscapes, prehistoric ruins, rock formations, architecture and still lifes.  His images are highly representational but contain multi-layered abstract elements.

Charles Brindley
Giant Hackberry Tree on Edge of Agricultural Landscape, with two studies
Oil on canvas

The tree reference for Giant Hackberry Tree on Edge of Agricultural Landscape was taken from drawings of an old hackberry on a steep hillside in Brentwood, Tennessee.  The agricultural fields were based on drawings from southern Logan County along the state line in Kentucky.  In this composite painting, a giant and ancient tree sets perched and clinging to a narrow embankment on the edge of a contemporary agricultural landscape described by lines that take the viewer into distant fields.  Underlying meanings of the painting imply ecological concern and naturalist insight.  Fallow fields, slightly out of season crops and tree foliage are suggestive of the artists' concerns.

Charles Brindley lives and maintains a studio in Adairville, a small community 35 miles north of Nashville, Tennessee.  He has been represented by galleries in numerous cities, including Nashville, Memphis, Taos, Washington, DC and New York City.  His work appears in public and corporate collections throughout the United States and in private collections internationally.  Five touring exhibitions of Brindley’s works have travelled to museums and art centers in the Southeast and Midwest.

 

There have been two major retrospectives of the artist’s career.  In 1998 the Tennessee State Museum presented Landscape Vision: Works of Charles Brindley 1980-1997, and in 2007 the Evansville Museum organized an exhibit of his work spanning a twenty year period.  Far Hills, Images of the Tennessee Residence, an exhibit of commissioned drawings and paintings of the historic mansion of Tennessee’s Governors completed a schedule of eight venues throughout the state in 2006.

 

Charles Brindley’s drawings and paintings depict a variety of symbol-laden subjects, including giant deciduous trees, panoramic landscapes, prehistoric ruins, rock formations, architecture and still lifes.  His images are highly representational but contain multi-layered abstract elements.

Ben Butler
Invention #60
Ink on paper

Ben Butler received a BA from Bowdoin College in 2000 and an MFA in sculpture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003.  Solo exhibitions of his sculptures and drawings have been shown in Chicago at Zg Gallery, in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, at John Davis Gallery in Hudson, New York, and at Suyama Space in Seattle, among other venues.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Individual Artist Grant and has attended numerous artist residencies including the MacDowell Colony, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.  Most recently, he was commissioned by Hyatt Regency Chicago to create a series of sculptures and a mural for their newly renovated lobby.  He currently lives in Quogue, New York and Memphis, Tennessee and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College. 

Barry Buxkamper
The Attack on Her Majesty's Ship Beagle, 1860-2008
Acrylic on canvas

The Attack on Her Majesty’s Ship Beagle, 1860-2008 began as the confluence of a book I was reading about Charles Darwin and an image I had seen in a scientific catalog; the image was of the model of a cutaway of an earthworm, which just happened to be a later subject of study for Darwin.  How the earthworm model came to be towed by Darwin’s expeditionary ship H.M.S. Beagle, under attack by aircraft, naval vessels—including a submarine flying the Papal flag—numerous references to Darwin’s experimental interests, and the presence of the Biblical Authenticator 2000 is a matter of conceptual improvisation during the process of painting.  All I knew for sure when I began the painting was that the earthworm model was so danged beautiful it had to drive the painting; all else followed suit.  Darwin’s grandson, by the way, has seen, and apparently liked, images he was shown of the finished painting.  What a nice conclusion to the process.

Barry Buxkamper was born in Peoria, IL in 1946, grew up in Texas, began exhibiting at Dave Hickey's "Clean Well Lighted Place" gallery, Austin, TX, in the late 1960’s and has lived and worked in Nashville, TN since 1972.  He has taught at George Peabody College (now of Vanderbilt University), worked as a graphic designer, and had his own illustration business for 12 years, doing a great deal of work for the music industry, primarily album covers.  He is now Professor Emeritus of Middle Tennessee State University, having taught 23 years in the Department of Art.  Buxkamper has been featured in the Whitney Biennial of Contemporary American Art, Whitney Museum, NY; the 1990 Mint Museum Biennial, Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte NC; and "20th Century Painting in Tennessee," Cheekwood Museum of Art, Nashville, TN.  His works are included in the collections of the McDonald’s Corporation, Chicago IL, Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, TN, The Bridgestone Collection, Nashville, TN, and Nations Bank, Charlotte NC, to name but a few. He is represented by Cumberland Gallery, Nashville, TN.

Dane Carder
For The Flag The Thousand Yard Stare The Light of Hope
Acrylic on panel

All three of these images are based on photographs that I took at the reenactment commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Shiloh in March of 2012.

Dane Carder was born (1972), raised, and still lives in Nashville, in the deep end of the pool of our nation’s history.  After several attempts at attaining an art degree, he opted for a long course of self-taught study in a studio at Chestnut Square.  For nearly twenty years, he has been steadfast in his pursuit to create meaningful work.  Dane has exhibited in a variety of art spaces and galleries, and for five years he has curated other artists’ shows at threesquared, a gallery within his studio.  For the last seven years, he has utilized Civil War images in a universal, symbolic expression of life’s ironic combination of tragedy and beauty, of despair and hope.

Charles Clary
Flameobic Opulation
Hand cut paper on panel

I use paper to create a world of fiction that challenges the viewer to suspend disbelief and venture into my fabricated reality.  By layering paper I am able to build intriguing land formations that mimic viral colonies and concentric sound waves.  These strange landmasses contaminate and infect the surfaces they inhabit transforming the space into something suitable for their gestation.  Towers of paper and color jut into the viewer’s space inviting playful interactions between the viewer and this conceived world.  These constructions question the notion of microbial outbreaks and their similarity to the visual representation of sound waves, transforming them into something more playful and inviting.

Charles Clary was born in 1980 in Morristown, Tennessee.  He received his BFA in painting with honors from Middle Tennessee State University and his MFA in painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design.  He recently had a solo exhibition at Galerie EVOLUTION-Pierre Cardin in Paris, France, completed a three week residency in Lacoste France, completed a painting assistantship with Joe Amrhein of Pierogi Gallery in Brooklyn NYC, and had work acquired by fashion designer Pierre Cardin and gallery owner James Cohan.  As of 2011, Charles had been featured in numerous print and Internet interviews including, WIRED magazine (US and UK), Hifructose.com, Beautifuldecay.com and Bluecanavs Magazine.  He has also been featured in publications including Papercraft 2 published by Gestalten and PUSH Paper published by Lark Books.  Charles has exhibited regionally, nationally, and internationally in numerous solo and group shows, is represented by The Rymer Galery in Nashville, TN, the Diana Lowenstein Gallery in Miami, FL, and currently lives and works in Murfreesboro, TN.

Maysey Craddock
Ninth Ward (after Friedrich)
Gouache and thread on found paper

This piece is based on an image I took in the Ninth Ward of New Orleans about 4 years after Katrina.  It was a structure that looked to have been an old warehouse or storage building, and it was collapsing slowly in the most fascinating way.  My work on the paper bags always starts with a photo that I have taken myself, which I then have blown up at Kinko's.  From the large photocopy I make a tracing on tracing paper, and at this stage much information is edited out and liberties are taken in adding line and form according to where I want the composition to go.  It is a way of reducing the literal image of the photograph into a more abstract linear form.  The tracing is then transferred onto the bag 'canvas' (large grocery sacks sewn together with silk thread) with carbon paper, thereby bringing the image yet another step further away from the original reality. 

The palette, atmosphere and mood of this piece was inspired by one of my favorite paintings of Caspar David Friedrich, called 'The Sea of Ice' from 1824.  I saw a parallel between his composition and the form of the building I found in the Ninth Ward, and wanted to draw a comparison not only between two disastrous events but also between two eras of artistic interpretation of the landscape.
 

Maysey Craddock is a painter and sculptor currently living and working in Memphis, TN.  Craddock received her BA in 1993 from Tulane University in New Orleans and her MFA in 2003 from Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine.  


Since the mid-nineties, Craddock’s work has appeared in exhibitions across the United States and in Germany.  Craddock has been an artist in residence at Oberpfälzer Künstlerhaus in Schwandorf, Germany; Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine; and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts in Amherst, Virginia.  She is also the recipient of two residency grants from the Vermont Studio Center and was awarded grants from the Louisiana Endowment for the Arts and the Tennessee Arts Commission.  Her work can be seen in many public and private collections, including the Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis, Tennessee and the Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock, Arkansas.  Recent shows have included Forest for the Trees at David Lusk Gallery, Present Tense at the Dixon Museum of Art and A Different Kind of Landscape at Brooks Museum of Art.

 

Craddock’s watercolor and gouache paintings on sewn paper bags reflect the strength and promise that can be found in profound change and loss.  Based on her own photographs of shifting landscapes, her paintings are intricate renderings of the intersection of man and nature, conjuring an atmosphere of absence and reclamation. 

She is represented nationally by David Lusk Gallery, Memphis; Sears Peyton Gallery, New York and Los Angeles, CA; and Cris Worley Fine Arts, Dallas. 

Greg Decker
Flying Horse
Oil on canvas

Flying Horse is one a series of many flying horses (and other animals) often with a rider, sometimes over an urban scene, that I continue to paint. This particular painting was finished in Asheville, NC. I wanted it to have a kind of magical, golden quality, and, though a flying figure, a sense of silence and intimacy.

Greg Decker describes himself as an "adventurous Symbolist painter."  He has been painting professionally for thirty years, twelve of which were spent in New York City, where he taught with the Metrolopolitan Museum and MoMA as a gallery lecturer. Raised overseas, Decker acknowledges the influences of other cultures on his work, and has always been interested in the mythical dimensions of narrative painting.  He paints large and small paintings in oil, often figurative in nature, and alive with patterns and color. Decker has had a long and special relationship with Nashville, though he currently resides most of the time in southern New Mexico.

Bob Delevante
Empty Closet Blue Light Bulb The Trash Can The Bookshelf
Archival pigment print

I'm trying to tell a story whether it's through a lyric and melody or in a printed photograph. I tend to shoot and print full frame images because I crop as I shoot. I prefer to discover the image and move around it – to compose from the image rather than as an afterthought. I try to always have a camera with me so my photographs are not posed. Capturing photographs – sometimes it's simply capturing a moment. Sometimes that beauty is a vast landscape in Montana – sometimes it's my daughter jumping off a diving board. Both equally as gorgeous – both equally challenging to render. As for process, I shoot what I have in my hand at the time. Some images are made with a plastic toy camera and others digital, including 35mm, half-frame and medium format.

Photographer and acclaimed recording artist and record producer Bob Delevante found Nashville, TN, by way of Hoboken, NJ.  While developing his music career on the east coast he earned a BFA in Communication Design from Parson School of Design.  After graduating he continued to pursue his musical calling and recorded for Rounder, Capitol Records and now his own independent label/creative company Bob Delevante Studios.

He rediscovered photography several years ago.  He uses all the creative mediums at his disposal such as photography, songwriting and design to capture and document glimpses of everyday life.  His unpretentious approach in both subject and method make Bob’s pictures instantly accessible and keep the emotion in his work honest and true to life.
 

Samuel Dunson
Ode to the First Mound The Harvester
Drawing media on masonite

My most recent works have become an important vice for my personal artistic expression.  These works exhibit a range of themes that have become increasingly important to me within the past decade of my life.  Themes involving love, acceptance of life and death, my personal narrative of being a black male in our society and my role as a husband and father are prevalent in my most recent works.  I am interested in how popular culture affects me in the context of these themes.  In creating these works, I choose to depict images that are personal to me, whilst having the ability to translate them in such a way as to invite the viewer in without appearing voyeuristic.

I am most comfortable working in a figurative manner in order to closely relate my subject matter to the human experience.  Rendering the figures in a somewhat stylized fashion allows me to hold the right to step outside reality while maintaining believability.  Storytelling is important in my process, but my works are intentionally becoming less narrative and more about the relation of form and function.   I am pleased when my works pose more questions than answers.  This allows the viewer to bring their own experiences into the work, as opposed to accepting mine.  I feel that my artwork is most powerful when it speaks to the viewer in such a way that he or she leaves with something that they did not have before they came.  My goal is for that something to be an appreciation of the artistic, creative and critical process.
 

Born: Dayton, OH 1970


Education: 2000 MFA, Savannah College of Art and Design (Graduated Outstanding Painting Student, 2000), 1992, BS in Studio Art, Tennessee State University.


The Arts have played a major role in Samuel Dunson’s life since his youth.  He was fortunate enough to be born into a household where exposure to the Arts was as important as academic study.  His parents, although not raised in the arts themselves, saw fit to give their children the experience of theater, dance, music and the visual arts by making annual trips to major metropolitan cities to view the arts as well as visiting galleries and museums in the Dayton, Ohio area.  Samuel was also a member of the Muse Machine which allowed its members to take field trips away from school in order to take part in artistic events. 
Samuel continued his formal education by enrolling in Tennessee State University.  He first majored in Architectural Engineering, but soon changed his major to Studio Art.  Early on in his academic and artistic pursuit he chose to work 3-dimensionally, but in the end, painting and drawing would peak his interest.  He began to exhibit his works soon after college.  From his exhibition record and portfolio, he gained admission into the Savannah College of Art and Design under a Presidential Fellowship award.  After a successful two years, he received his MFA in painting. 


Samuel now exhibits his paintings in group and solo shows on a regular basis.  His works have been reported and critiqued in art journals and newspapers alike.  Samuel teaches painting, drawing and 2D design, as well as Art Appreciation at Tennessee State University.  He has been employed by the University since 2000.

Robert Durham
Lightness of Being
Oil on canvas

The diptych Lightness of Being was selected in 2002 to be part of a traveling exhibition sponsored by The Meridian International Center in Washington, DC. True Colors – Meditations on the American Spirit was curated by Pamela Bailey, William Dunlap, and Nancy Mathews and was an invitational exhibition of American artists’ response to the tragedy of 9/11. With support from the State Department the show subsequently toured nationally and internationally for four years. A complete listing of the exhibitions venues are:

Washington, DC.
National Arts Club, N.Y., NY
Topaki Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
Atlanta, GA
Palm Beach, FL
West Palm Beach, FL
Allied Museum, Berlin, Germany
Ormeau Baths Gallery, Belfast, Northern Ireland
National Gallery of Arts, Tirana, Albania
Danubiana Gallery, Bratislava, Slovakia
Los Angeles, California
Dallas, TX

Robert Durham grew up in Gallatin, Tennessee.  After graduating from Vanderbilt University magna cum laude with a degree in English, he became interested in visual art.  From 1979 to 1994 he worked as a freelance illustrator based outside of New York City before returning to Nashville and concentrating on painting.  In 1998 he earned his MFA with distinction in drawing and painting from the University of Georgia.  Since then he has resided in Nashville and has taught drawing and painting at Watkins College of Art and Design, Sewanee, Vanderbilt University, and currently at MTSU.  His paintings have been exhibited both nationally and internationally and are represented in Nashville by Cumberland Gallery. 

Beth Edwards
Wish
Oil on canvas

Wish depicts a bed of coneflowers that once grew in my garden.  This subject functions as a classic “vanitas” image, in that flowers in various states of bloom and decay represent life’s ephemerality.  I am drawn to these particular flowers because they are commonplace, humble and somewhat cartoonish in their version of natural beauty.

The gray, slightly foreboding sky and the dilapidated wishing well suggest that things might not work out.  To be wishful might be to be foolishly optimistic.

Beth Edwards was born in Decatur, Alabama in 1960.  She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Tyler School of Art and her Master of Fine Arts from Indiana University.  She has exhibited at the Gallery NAGA in Boston, the Clark Gallery in Lincoln, Massachusetts, the Leonard Tachmes Gallery in Miami, the Plus One Plus Two Gallery in London and is represented by the David Lusk Gallery in Memphis and the Tory Folliard Gallery in Milwaukee.  Her work is in numerous public and private collections including the Howard and Judith Tullman Collection in Chicago, the Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis and the Tennessee Arts Commission in Nashville.  Her work appeared in New American Paintings in 2001, 2004 and 2011 and was featured on the cover twice.  She has been a fellow at the MacDowell and Yaddo artist colonies.  She has taught at the University of Memphis since 2000.

Richard Feaster
Octopus
Mixed media on canvas

Produced for a 2009 exhibit at Nashville’s Zeitgeist Gallery, Octopus draws upon a highly personal visual vocabulary, and includes imagery inspired by experiences of psychedelia, disorientation, fragmentation, and nostalgia.  This painting presents the viewer with what Independent Curator David Gibson has called “visual puzzles that have a metaphysical enjoinder.”  Feaster employs a variety of techniques, and the resultant object is a hybrid of drawing, painting, and collage.  The culmination of lengthy processes that include splattering, pouring, staining, collage, décollage and dry pigment applications, this painting opens a fresh discourse with the tenets of abstraction while skewing that language towards new sites of inquiry. 

Richard Feaster received an MFA from Tulane University’s Newcomb College, and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.  He has exhibited his work nationally, including showings at the National Academy, the City University of New York/Hunter College, and the Cheekwood Museum of Art, where in 2006 he had a one-person exhibition in Cheekwood’s Temporary Contemporary series.

John Folsom
Shaker Frontier VIII Shaker Frontier IX
Pigment print on board with oil and wax medium

John Folsom (b. 1967) is a mixed media artist born and raised in Paducah, Kentucky.  He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Cinema and Photography from Southern Illinois University.  His work demonstrates the narrative potential of landscape imagery and the profound longing for representational space.  Folsom’s work has been exhibited extensively throughout North America and can be found in many public and private collections.  His work was most recently acquired for the private collection of Jon Stewart.  

Trey Gossett
In Between Spaces Spindle
Enamel on laminated plywood

Trey Gossett was born and raised in Kansas City.  Beginning his career in the arts, Gossett primarily worked in small metals and jewelry, and in 2001, moved to Arcata, CA where he received a degree in sculpture from Humboldt State University.  While in California, Gossett worked with the Eureka based art group Empire Squared, helping to create and run the Empire Squared gallery and studio space.  To continue his education, Gossett moved to Illinois and earned his MFA in sculpture from Southern Illinois University in 2008.  It was at this time that Gossett moved to Tennessee and worked as the artist in residence at the Appalachian Center for Craft in Smithville, TN.  As of the summer of 2012, Gossett calls Nashville home.  He continues to create work in his mobile studio and currently exhibits his sculpture on the regional and national levels.  

Warren Greene
Underpass Untitled
Oil on panel

The paintings arrive through consideration of the land of my upbringing and the forms and ideas that reform that land.  Like the land, it is reformed, reordered, and refined.  The paintings are viewed through layers of highly sanded, translucent surfaces that conceal and reveal a struggle with beauty, faith, and significance.

Mary Addison Hackett
Mystic Hovercraft
Acrylic and oil on canvas

I'm interested in the parameters of painting and the ever-shifting construction of meaning, memory, and representation in day-to-day life.  I vary my approach to painting by constructing a visual language from fragments of stored information, as well working from direct observation, personal photographs, and multiple other sources, both visual and literary.  Even though I have a general idea of how I will approach a painting, I rarely know how it will look or what it means until after it is done.  Mystic Hovercraft is part of a larger body of work influenced by the writings of John Ruskin, the 19th century art critic who wrote Modern Painters, a treatise on 'truths' in painting with particular regard to the natural world.

Mary Addison Hackett (b.1961, Atlanta, GA) is a painter with a background in video art and narrative.  Solo and group exhibitions include About Face, curated by Daniel Weinberg at ACME (Los Angeles); To Live and Paint in LA at the Torrance Art Museum (Torrance, California); John Davis Gallery (Hudson, NY); Weekend (Los Angeles, CA); Kristi Engle Gallery (Los Angeles, CA); and the Arts in the Embassies Program in Montevideo, Uruguay, among others.  Her work has been critically reviewed by Christopher Knight in the Los Angeles Times, and featured in New American Paintings and numerous other publications.  Professional awards and recognition include project grants from The Ruth Chenven Foundation, The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, The Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, and national and international residencies.  Her work is included in permanent and private collections throughout the United States.

Born and raised in the South, Hackett lived and worked in Chicago and Los Angeles before returning to her family home in Nashville where she currently maintains a studio.  She holds an MFA in Studio Art from the University of Illinois at Chicago and her BFA in Painting from the University of Tennessee.
 

Kristi Hargrove
Through Saturated
Graphite on paper

Kristi has been teaching at the collegiate level for over 18 years.  With an interest in philosophy and literature, Kristi’s work considers the physical and psychological places of seepage—between language, bodies, and relationships.  Kristi’s studio practice is primarily drawing but includes investigations into other media (photography, sculpture, and installation) as the nature of the investigation dictates.  She is a member of the artist collective Coop, a curatorial group made up of artists, curators, thinkers and professors who are committed to expanding Nashville’s dialogue with contemporary art by presenting challenging new or under-represented artists/artworks in the community.  Her work has been shown in numerous juried shows and invitational exhibitions across the country.  Kristi has studied with Laurie Palmer (of HaHa), Jeanne Dunning and Faith Wilding in Chicago, Mira Schor in New York, and Steve Kurtz of Critical Art Assemble. 


Kristi received her BA from Vanderbilt University and her MFA from Vermont College of Fine Art.  She is currently the Chair of the Fine Art Department, as well as an Associate Professor of Fine Arts, at Watkins College of Art, Design and Film.

Brady Haston
Streetwalker
Oil on canvas

My painting, Streetwalker, comes from observations made along the infamous Dickerson Pike here in Nashville, and captures the goings and comings of one its notorious inhabitants.

 

Brady Haston is a native of Spencer, Tennessee and currently teaches printmaking at Watkins College of Art and Design.  Brady earned a BFA from Middle Tennessee State University in 1992, and during 1991 he also attended the University of Georgia’s Studies Abroad Program in Cortona, Italy.  After his undergraduate studies he attended Montana State University (Bozeman) and was awarded a MFA in 1997.  Following graduate school, Brady spent the next eight years in Chicago teaching at Columbia College before moving back to Nashville.  His shows of note include Paintings and Sketchbooks at the Cheekwood Museum of Art, the Los Angeles Printmaking Society National Exhibition in 2003, The Portrait, An Investigation of the Self at Camberwell College of Art in London, England in 2003, Bacchanal at the Appalachian Center for Crafts in 2004, Art Chicago in 2006, Intersection at the Contemporary Artist Workshop in Chicago during 2006, Abstract Painting in Tennessee at the Cheekwood Museum of Art in Nashville in the summer of 2008, and Superstruct at PLUG Projects in Kansas City in 2012.

Brady is represented by Zeitgeist Gallery of Nashville.

Jodi Hays
Progress, You Can Never Get it Back
Oil on linen

I make paintings that circumscribe ideas of the unfinished and upheaval.  I use brushes, palette knives, cards, anything to get paint on the surface.  Using tape, I measure off lines and reuse the masking tape. The result is work that questions the nature of representation through process and image.  


I refer to landscape to speak to situations of transition and change.  I am intrigued by how everyday objects and images in our landscape can explore personal circumstance, as I use personal biography to inform my materials, titles, image and process.  I am interested in a kind of aesthetic redemption, that a painting can explore a sum of disparate parts and make them whole.

Jodi Hays received her MFA from Vermont College and her BFA from The University of Tennessee.  Her exhibitions are included in collections of the J. Crew Company (NY), Gordon College (MA), among others.  Residencies include The Cooper Union School of Art, The National Parks of America and fellowships to the Vermont Studio Center.  Her work is included in several curated artists’ registries:  The Drawing Center (NY) and Nurture Art (NY).  She was the recipient of the Individual Artist Fellowship from the Tennessee Arts Commission 2011-12.

Tim Hooper
Johnny Cash Davy Crockett
Acrylic on wood

Johnny Cash
Mr. Cash is one of my all-time favorite subjects.  I love his music, but visually he has a very interesting and recognizable face.  Johnny Cash rose from very humble beginnings in rural Arkansas to great fame and critical acclaim through his music.  My painting of Johnny is about him as a young man and that moment in time where he is transformed from an ordinary guy into a superstar.

 

Davy Crockett

Few people are as important to the history of Tennessee as Davy Crockett.  In many ways Crockett personifies the frontier spirit of Tennessee.  He was very much a self-made man, rising out of the untamed wilderness to represent his state in the U.S. Congress

I grew up in Nashville, TN in the 70’s and 80’s – a typical middle-class kid who watched way too much TV.  My first artistic endeavors were drawing on the walls of my closet with purple crayon, copying characters from the funny pages and rendering all four members of Kiss.  In high school, some kid brough an R. Crumb comic book to school.  Crumb’s art had a huge impact on me and inspired me to become a cartoonist.  I spent my twenties creating comics and trying to get them published (with little success).  As I look back, drawing countless comic strips and teaching myself to draw, was the best training I could have had.  Self-training enabled me to develop a unique style filled with peculiar relationships between scale and proportion, mixed with an odd sense of perspective.  By the time I finally got around to going to college, I had a pretty clear vision of what I wanted my art to be.  Fortunately for me, I found a printmaking professor who liked what I was doing (or didn’t mind as much as the other professors) and allowed me to make the art that was floating around in my head.

After college, a myriad of low-paying, dead-end jobs, and limited prospects in the cartooning business, I picked up a paint brush and began to paint in 1998. 

My paintings are an extension of what I was doing as a cartoonist, though not quite the same linear narrative as comic strips.  Again, through self-training, and trial and error, my paintings have evolved into distinctive artwork.

Tim Hooper
William Edmondson Minnie Pearl
Acrylic on wood

William Edmondson
William Edmondson was an uneducated man from Nashville who worked most of his adult life as a janitor in a hospital.  Later in life he discovered an interest in sculpting limestone.  He transformed chunks of rock into rabbits, squirrels, angels, and people of all sorts.  Within a couple of years he became the first African-American to have a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  My painting is about how I would imagine Mr. Edmondson’s work space to look like.  He is seated and surrounded by his creations.

 

Minnie Pearl
As Minnie Pearl, Mrs. Sarah Cannon had a long and successful career on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry.  She is one of the most beloved people in the history of Nashville’s music industry.  She is much admired for her many charitable contributions, especially her dedication to the care of cancer patients.  Part of Minnie’s stage persona includes stories of her fictional hometown of “Grinder Switch.”  My painting features “cousin” Minnie on the road ready to leave Grinder Switch and head up to the big city of Nashville.

I grew up in Nashville, TN in the 70’s and 80’s – a typical middle-class kid who watched way too much TV.  My first artistic endeavors were drawing on the walls of my closet with purple crayon, copying characters from the funny pages and rendering all four members of Kiss.  In high school, some kid brough an R. Crumb comic book to school.  Crumb’s art had a huge impact on me and inspired me to become a cartoonist.  I spent my twenties creating comics and trying to get them published (with little success).  As I look back, drawing countless comic strips and teaching myself to draw, was the best training I could have had.  Self-training enabled me to develop a unique style filled with peculiar relationships between scale and proportion, mixed with an odd sense of perspective.  By the time I finally got around to going to college, I had a pretty clear vision of what I wanted my art to be.  Fortunately for me, I found a printmaking professor who liked what I was doing (or didn’t mind as much as the other professors) and allowed me to make the art that was floating around in my head.

After college, a myriad of low-paying, dead-end jobs, and limited prospects in the cartooning business, I picked up a paint brush and began to paint in 1998. 

My paintings are an extension of what I was doing as a cartoonist, though not quite the same linear narrative as comic strips.  Again, through self-training, and trial and error, my paintings have evolved into distinctive artwork.

Anna Jaap
SKYFIELD 8 (when the hours of daylight are few and the hours of darkness many)
Acrylic and charcoal on canvas

This work is part of the SKYFIELD series—sixteen works on canvas created over a two year period with a focus on the intersections of physical and spiritual reality.

The descriptive title phrase “when the hours of daylight are few and the hours of darkness many” is taken from a book entitled Botany for Gardeners by Harold William Rickett, published in 1957.  It speaks eloquently of the period of dormancy in the life cycle that is necessary to foster new beginnings.

Anna Jaap was born in Arlington, TX in 1966.  She received her BFA Magna Cum Laude from Lipscomb University in 1987 with an emphasis in classical painting.  For twenty-five years, she has maintained a working studio—establishing herself first as a printmaker before shifting her focus to painting and drawing in 2001.  Over the course of her career, Jaap has created a body of work characterized by articulate beauty, ongoing material exploration, and a deep connection to the natural world.

Jaap’s artwork is collected internationally, and has been exhibited in museums and in galleries across the United States.  Selected clients include Avon, Agricultural Bank of China, BentleyForbes, Paramount Pictures, Ralph Lauren Home, and Tiffany.

William Killebrew
Planted 12 jack in the pulpits That night the clouds were really bright
Oil on canvas

Both the pieces at Music City Center are part of a group of four that were exhibited for the first time at the Parthenon Museum in Nashville in the fall of 2012.  They were accompanied by a suite of string quartets commissioned by Bill Killebrew and composed by Rachel Devore Fogarty.  The music was premiered at the opening and is also available in CD format from the artist and can be downloaded from Amazon.  The quartet is entitled “At No Time was Any of This Untrue.”   There are four sections, one for each painting.  The two paintings at the Center are the first and last of the series and the titles of the paintings are also the titles of the music compositions.

All of the paintings center around a particular Redbud tree and cover a range of seasons and times and weather conditions.  They also serve as a metaphor for interior space and reflection.  As the series progressed the paintings became more abstract.  The first one completed was actually the third in the series and is the most representational.  The music followed suit and the last pieces were actually written before the paintings were completed so the collaboration was twofold and horizontal.

Bill Killebrew is a native of Nashville but spent his early years as a child of a military serviceman with the result that he spent the first fourteen years of his life during the fifties and sixties moving around a lot, first to Munich for three years, then to Savannah, GA.  The family really hoped to stay there but that was not to be.  After the Cuban crisis subsided they were stationed in upstate New York for four years and later near Macon, GA.  After his father’s retirement from active duty they settled in Nashville in 1968.

It was always Bill’s plan to have a career in the sciences but after a brief foray in that world culminating in a disastrous year in chemistry he turned to the arts, specifically painting.  He was helped in this decision by a relationship with Arnold Nye, a painter, sailor and architect who married his grandmother in the fifties and who influenced him deeply.  He was also supported by Edna Scales at Hillsboro High School and later by his painting professor, David Ledoux, in the Art Department at MTSU.

About halfway through his undergraduate program Bill broke with prevailing trends in the department to start on the path he has been on ever since.  Mr. Ledoux was supportive of Bill in this decision by allowing him to briefly separate himself from the department studio/critique format and work independently for awhile, enabling him to begin to form an aesthetic and a painting stance that has stayed with him for forty years.

During his university years Bill met and married Rebecca Hollaway.  They have been married 37 years and have raised two sons, one currently residing in New York City and one in Takoma Park, Maryland.  They have three grandchildren.

After graduation Bill supported himself and his family working in his father’s distribution business.  After a few years he formed a small company specializing in wood flooring and has remained in that business, working on projects large and small including the Governor’s office and residence and Schermerhorn Symphony Center.  After painting in various spaces including garages, rented attics, spare bedrooms and basements he saw his chance and built a large painting studio on the back of his current residence about ten years ago and has worked there ever since.  He also has a lithography studio in Cummins Station.

Bill has always considered himself a full-time painter and works every day.  He considers his decision to be bi-vocational as realistic in light of his desire to support his family and remain in the South, rooted where his family has been for several generations.  He has never wished to teach and considers himself to be richly blessed with family, friends, church and work.

Baldwin Lee
Mural - Big South Fork 1999
Archival pigment print

Born 1951, Brooklyn, New York 
 

Education
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Bachelor of Science, 1972; studied with Minor White
Yale University School of Art, Master of Fine Arts, 1975;
studied with Walker Evans

Grants and Awards
National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, 1990
Commission to photograph for America’s Forgotten Places, a bicentennial commemoration 
of the U.S. Constitution, 1987
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, 1984
National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, 1984

Teaching
Professor of Art, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, 1982 to present
Provost’s Excellence in Teaching Award, University of Tennessee, 2001
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Visiting Professor, 1991-1992
University of Tennessee National Alumni Outstanding Teaching Award, 1988
Inaugurated Photography Program at University of Tennessee, 1982
Head of Photography Department, full-time Assistant Professor of Photography,
Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, Massachusetts, 1979 to 1982
Assistant Professor of Photography, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 1975 to 1979

Permanent Collections
Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York
University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor, Michigan
University of Kentucky Art Museum, Lexington, Kentucky
Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut
National Trust for Historic Preservation
Museum of the City of New York, New York, New York

He resides in Tennessee where he is a professor of art at the University of Tennessee.

Megan Lightell
Quiet Evening Heavy Rain Passing Through
Oil on canvas

The works in this series were originally created for an exhibit at Zeitgeist Gallery.  The imagery comes from a trip our family took to the western U.S., which was my first exposure to the open, flat land and large skies of the Midwest plains.  It was my intention to explore the sparse simplicity of this unfamiliar landscape through a series of images that would relate to one another.  There is a sense of time passing, as a storm rolls through, but the pieces can also be experienced as single isolated moments.

Born in rural Coshocton County, Ohio, Megan Lightell grew up among quiet fields and farms, imagery that rests at the core of her work today.  After earning a BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 2000, she returned to the subject of land and the connection that humans have with the environment that sustains them.  Her paintings have been exhibited in numerous one-woman and group shows throughout the United States, and reside in various private and corporate collections including the Cal Turner Family, Martha Ingram, Kix and Barbara Brooks, Fearing’s at the Ritz-Carlton Dallas, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.  Her work has been featured in several publications, including Architectural Digest and ABC’s Extreme Makeover Home Edition and is published worldwide as fine art print editions by Canadian Art Prints.  She attempts to capture in her paintings a sense of stillness found when we allow ourselves to be alone with land.

Pam Longobardi
Wonder Wounded Worlds Within Worlds
Oil and patinas over copper

Atlanta-based Pam Longobardi has had exhibitions in galleries and museums in the US, China, Italy, Spain, Finland, Slovakia, Poland, Germany, Japan, Greece and Monaco.  Her artworks are in numerous collections, both public and private.  A recipient of many awards, Longobardi is Professor of Art at GSU and created the Drifters Project in 2006, a conceptual artistic research project focusing on the global ocean marker of contemporary archeology, the drifting plastic object.   She exhibited this work in Beijing at NY ARTS/Beijing (2008 Olympics) and at ARTLIFEfortheworld in (2009 Venice Biennale ARTE VISIVI collateral exhibitions).  Edizione Charta (Milan, NY) published a book on the project titled Drifters:  Plastics, Pollution and Personhood in 2010.  Recent past exhibitions include Voyages on an Uncanny Sea at Gallery Diet in Miami, a commission of new work for Oceanomania at the Nouveau Musée National de Monaco, and at Savvy Contemporary in Berlin.  She is engaged in a long-term project in Greece in collaboration with the Ionion Center for Art and Culture, and in June 2013, will participate in the GYRE expedition, an art-science research project along Alaska’s remote coasts that will culminate in a exhibition opening in Feb 2014 at the Anchorage Museum and will travel for four years by the Smithsonian.  She has recently been named a finalist for the Hudgens Prize, and has summer 2013 shows as part of the Venice Biennale and works in Seescape at George Adams Gallery in New York.  

Pam Longobardi
Broken Pangaea (superego)
Oil, enamels, patinas, gold and collage over copper

Atlanta-based Pam Longobardi has had exhibitions in galleries and museums in the US, China, Italy, Spain, Finland, Slovakia, Poland, Germany, Japan, Greece and Monaco.  Her artworks are in numerous collections, both public and private.  A recipient of many awards, Longobardi is Professor of Art at GSU and created the Drifters Project in 2006, a conceptual artistic research project focusing on the global ocean marker of contemporary archeology, the drifting plastic object.   She exhibited this work in Beijing at NY ARTS/Beijing (2008 Olympics) and at ARTLIFEfortheworld in (2009 Venice Biennale ARTE VISIVI collateral exhibitions).  Edizione Charta (Milan, NY) published a book on the project titled Drifters:  Plastics, Pollution and Personhood in 2010.  Recent past exhibitions include Voyages on an Uncanny Sea at Gallery Diet in Miami, a commission of new work for Oceanomania at the Nouveau Musée National de Monaco, and at Savvy Contemporary in Berlin.  She is engaged in a long-term project in Greece in collaboration with the Ionion Center for Art and Culture, and in June 2013, will participate in the GYRE expedition, an art-science research project along Alaska’s remote coasts that will culminate in a exhibition opening in Feb 2014 at the Anchorage Museum and will travel for four years by the Smithsonian.  She has recently been named a finalist for the Hudgens Prize, and has summer 2013 shows as part of the Venice Biennale and works in Seescape at George Adams Gallery in New York.  

(Twin) Terry Lynn
Standing Still At the River
Acrylic on canvas

My current body of work deals with my past and our current culture.  I’ve always had an interest in the good, bad, and ugly of society–how we value the worth of another and their role as a member of it.  I want my work to create a dialog that addresses the stereotypes and cultural norms that our society is permeated with.  Behind layers of falseness I seek the truth.  These paintings are autobiographical, a reflection of my response to the everyday.  I use symbols and metaphors as identifiable cues to tell a story.   

James Makuac
Fishing Kilimanjaro
Acrylic on canvas

James Makuac’s artwork tells his unique story of change and hope from Sudan to the United States.

“…When I fled in 1987, I passed through the following routes; Ajakgeer, Baairet, Piom, Kuum, Macabol, Gumuruo, Ukelo, Pibor, Pochalla, Ajuara, Gilo River, final destination Panyidou Camp, Etiopia.  When you don’t face any dangers in your life nothing to worry about to be remembered.  I do remember all these routes, because these where I passed through and is where I met difficulties and is where some friends remained, in the desert, under the trees and the resulted of the remainders there, was death.  We usually walked at night and hide in the tall grass of Ajakgeer savanna during the day, and we were walked on bare feet were constantly infected from thorns and snakebites.  Conditions which attracted by lions, leopards, and hyenas, wolves.  Many who weren’t killed by wild animals succumbed to dehydration, starvation and exhaustion.  You know when you fled away in dangers, no time to take any food with you, because you wanna save life first.  We got nothing to eat, in such situations what you gonna do, is better to think a lot, so by the same time, we cooked our minds not to die from hunger, we survived on leaves and berries.  And drank water with mud from nearly dry pools.  The older boys promised food and water in a few days to keep us going…”
- Excerpt from James Makuac’s website
 

Michael McBride
Family Traditions
Oil on canvas

This painting was inspired by the traditions of African Americans in the south who were sharecroppers and eventually had the own land.  There are many iconographies displayed in the painting, such as the American flag as the blanket representing the idea for every freed slave to get forty acres and a mule as reparations.  The plowed field represents the new fresh start and the planted field represents the harvest that will take place from the great effort put forth.  The nude baby represents the continuation of the tradition.  The painting technique that I use is called Kaleidoscope painting.  I use geometric designs and patters to break up the color and image.

Michael J. McBride, a native Tennessean, earned his undergraduate degree in art, from Tennessee State University and his graduate degree in painting from Illinois State University, where he credits Dr. Harold Gregor with providing a world class artistic mentorship.  Currently, as an instructor of art at Tennessee State University and former Adjunct faculty at Watkins College of Art and Design and Film school, his commitment to the Nashville art world's future has always been at the forefront of his own career.   McBride served as curator of the Hiram V. Gordon Gallery at Tennessee State University from 1995 – 2000 and has been the lead artist on many community-based projects in Nashville, Sister Cities Mural Projects as well as Nashville International Airport's Arts in the Airport program.  Michael is currently a member of the Board of Trustees for the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville, TN, The Arts in the Airport Board, Tennessee Art League Board, and a member of The Nashville Artist Guild and South Arts southern artist registry.

 

McBride was featured in Visions of My People, sixty years of African American art in Tennessee, an exhibit organized by the Tennessee State Museum and one of his pieces was purchased for their permanent collection.   He was one of twelve Nashville artists selected by the Tennessean newspaper for inclusion in the Millennium 2000 Collection, a signal honor.  Another honor was the Side by Side sister cities exhibition in Belfast, Northern Ireland, featuring 17 artists from Nashville and 17 artists from Ireland.  His most recent honor was the summer of 2005 – a ten weeks artist in residence in Bermuda with the MasterWorks Museum of Bermuda Art.  His current body of work titled “Too Black Too Fast” is a traveling exhibition of art about African- American jockeys and trainers.  McBride’s work is included in both private and corporate collections in the US and abroad.  His work has been featured on television sitcoms, such as Living Single, The Wayans Bros. Show, and The Jamie Foxx Show.  Michael has also illustrated children's books and book covers for several publishing groups.

Carrie McGee
On This Ground
Rust, pigments, oil and UV printing on transparent acrylic

On This Ground was created over a period of many months.  Draw­ing inspi­ra­tion from the Music City Center con­struc­tion site and the Nashville Flood of 2010, the work centers on ideas of meaning as expressed in process and contained in the stories of a particular place.

 

Metal objects sal­vaged from the site were used to cre­ate a variety of rust imprints, while images abstracted from aerial photography were also lay­ered into the work.

 

Aerial Innovations of Tennessee, charged with documenting the Music City Center construction process, graciously provided access to their extensive image archives.  Early photographs of the building’s founda­tion taken in May 2010, just after Nashville was flooded, are unex­pect­edly beau­ti­ful, as is a dreamy image of structural scaffolding.

Born 1954, Cincinnati, Ohio

 

Immaculate Heart College, Los Angeles, California

BA, 1976

 

Carrie McGee’s mixed media constructions explore process and variation within repeated forms. Utilizing transparent acrylic as a ground, she experiments with natural and chemical processes, such as rust and oxidation, to create luminous works that emanate a meditative pulse.

 

McGee’s investigations developed on the periphery of her work as an abstract painter. In the midst of a studio move she discovered a sheet of vinyl containing a multi-layered pattern of rust spheres, the result of a slow ceiling leak. The illuminated metal impressions were unexpectedly beautiful, and possessed a combination of organic and industrial qualities McGee sought in her paintings. Initially experienced as playful experimentation, this work became the central focus of McGee’s efforts, and soon evolved from ephemeral to lasting and architectural in scope.

McGee has lived in many parts of the United States, having migrated from Cincinnati to Los Angeles, New York, and finally Nashville. 

Carol Mode
Stretching the Limits
Acrylic on canvas

The energy that moved this painting is part of the constant rhythm and energy of Nashville.  As I began to think about the scale of this work’s surrounding space, several possibilities took shape.  Being a “process” painter naturally led me to try large forms in sweeping spaces.  What I finally explored, however, was more dense and varied. 

My decisions were influenced by the way this painting fit closely with the specific positioning provided by the site – and its connection to the other works on the wall.  The bold architectural vision provided by the Music City Center then led to a series of strong and unexpected relationships.  This concept carried through to the work’s final stages. 

Living in Nashville has made me aware of tremendous possibilities, one of which appears over and over in my work – the need to push forward and to test one’s limits.  In Stretching the Limits, taking bold steps has been my motivation.

Carol Mode was born in St. Louis, Missouri and received her BFA degree in Painting at Washington University.  She began her painting career in Italy, where she and her husband, art historian Robert Mode, lived for a year in Venice on a Fulbright Fellowship.  Her first invitation to exhibit was while living in Italy.

After moving to Nashville, Mode worked for Cheekwood Museum of Art, then taught Painting in the Art Department at Belmont University.  Over the years, Mode received important artist residencies from the Christoph Merian Foundation in Basel, Switzerland, the Wurlitzer Foundation in New Mexico, and the Ucross Foundation in Wyoming.  In addition, she was a Visiting Artist at the American Academy in Rome, Italy.

Mode’s work has been curated twice for publication in New American Paintings, an annual juried art periodical.  She has been curated into hundreds of exhibitions throughout the U.S. and abroad and is represented by Sandler Hudson Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia.  Mode has had over 20 solo exhibitions, and is currently preparing for an exhibition in 2014 at Tinney Contemporary in Nashville.  Mode’s paintings are in collections across the country and abroad.  Recently, her work was purchased by FirstBank for their new corporate art collection.

Christie Nuell
Cold Target
Laser engraving, stains, ink on gessoed masonite

In Cold Target we are in an open space, possibly on a hill.  We are confronted with trees and unable to see our way through, or even to see what might be beyond them.  A small blue-green target indicates a human presence, but we cannot tell whether we are the hunters or the hunted.  In parts of the image the trees disappear into the stains of the background, in an echo of their upright forms.  The scale of the work contributes to the way we react to this piece.

Born in Oxford, England, Christie Nuell has lived in the United Kingdom, Italy, the Isle of Man, and the United States.  She received her undergraduate degree from SUNY College at Geneseo, and her MFA from the University of Georgia.  Nuell is Professor Emeritus of Middle Tennessee State University’s Department of Art, where she taught from 1981 until 2012.

 

Nuell brings her deep knowledge of printmaking processes and technology together in her artwork, mixing media in unusual ways to create work that incorporates a range of techniques including laser engraving from digital files onto surfaces including paper, wood, and masonite.  Frequently the surfaces are treated with paint, stains, or ink, and then are re-engraved with additional imagery.  The effect is a rich patina of lines, color, and deliberate pentimenti.  Informational graphics and binary code appear in fragments, suggesting the demise of the industrial revolution and the rise of the age of information, emphasizing the visual systems on which both were built.  

Christie Nuell
A Vital Plan
Laser engraving, stains, ink on gessoed masonite

In A Vital Plan, Nuell contrasts the beauty and precision of old engineering engravings, with the rough, stained surface on the truncated squares containing fragments of information, including maps of the London Underground.  Organic shapes represent nature and the passage of time, while the tight geometry is indicative of the efforts of civilization.

Born in Oxford, England, Christie Nuell has lived in the United Kingdom, Italy, the Isle of Man, and the United States.  She received her undergraduate degree from SUNY College at Geneseo, and her MFA from the University of Georgia.  Nuell is Professor Emeritus of Middle Tennessee State University’s Department of Art, where she taught from 1981 until 2012.

 

Nuell brings her deep knowledge of printmaking processes and technology together in her artwork, mixing media in unusual ways to create work that incorporates a range of techniques including laser engraving from digital files onto surfaces including paper, wood, and masonite.  Frequently the surfaces are treated with paint, stains, or ink, and then are re-engraved with additional imagery.  The effect is a rich patina of lines, color, and deliberate pentimenti.  Informational graphics and binary code appear in fragments, suggesting the demise of the industrial revolution and the rise of the age of information, emphasizing the visual systems on which both were built.  

Ron Porter
Back Beat
Oil and acrylic on canvas

I like to paint and that sustains me.

The imagery gives a nod to surrealism. The visuals are psychologically open ended.  The paintings result from reflection, trial and error, and the evocation of faith and chance. Traditional painting practices serve as a framework that gives me a sense of place in the long history of painting. The aspect of keeping the door open during the process and the multilayered meaning in the work reflects much of how I see the ambiguous nature of reality. 

Jairo Prado
Interlude
Ceramic tile

Inspired by the iconic symbol of "Music City, USA" as well as the musical roots of my Latino heritage, the guitar is a recurring subject in my work.  This composition was created by the deconstructing of the physical form and an asymmetrical, cubist-inspired reconstruction of over 800 unique shapes and 40 colors which emphasize movement and depth.  Sounds are represented by vibrant color relationships which create each shape within the composition.  This work is a visual picture of the spiritual voice emanating from this versatile instrument, capable of expressing a wide spectrum of human emotions through a culmination of melodies, vibrations and rhythms. 

A native of Colombia, South America, Jairo Prado has lived and worked as a visual artist in Nashville for almost 30 years, creating commissioned works and exhibiting nationally and internationally.   His work has been recently featured in solo exhibitions at the Leu Gallery at Belmont University and the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, as well as part of the Biennial Best of Tennessee Craft Artists at the Hunter Museum of American Art.  His work can be found in numerous public and private collections including the Tennessee State Museum, Belmont University, Watkins College of Art, and the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.  His most significant public work, "Migration," is a large-scale mosaic mural commissioned by Conexión Américas for the exterior façade of Nashville's new Casa Azafrán Community Center.

 

Prado has also been an educator to the community, sharing his passion for art with youth and adults through local and national universities, community-based organizations, and arts institutes, including Watkins College of Art, the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, and Conexión Américas.  His work with the community focuses on celebrating the history, culture, and creative expression of those who inhabit the city.  As a result, many large-scale community-created murals and sculptural works are permanently displayed throughout Nashville and beyond.

Kit Reuther
Orbit
Oil and graphite on canvas

The modern environment of my childhood home in suburban Nashville is where I recall an early awareness of the power of minimal design.  Surrounded by unembellished surfaces, clean lines and open space, I began to connect the dots between the blank canvas and a creative imagination.  That influence remained with me through several early design-related jobs, before embarking on a 20+year art career centered on painting and more recently sculpture.

My paintings continue to expand on a personal vocabulary of primitive marks and abstract shapes.  I rely on an explorative process that often leaves behind remnants of editing that remain evident through translucent layers of paint.  Dark masses of pigment are applied with a heavy hand, then counterbalanced with loose scribbles and graphite marks.  Highly pigmented colors are used judiciously, and only intended to quietly enliven the predominate palette of weathered whites, warm grays and blacks.  Each canvas is an organic process of adding and removing until a desired level of intention and randomness is achieved.

Lisa Rivas
Nascent Seeds
Watercolor, wax, graphite and sequins on rice paper

Lisa Rivas is a bilingual, bi-cultural, and multi-talented fine arts painter, professional surface designer, and computer graphics specialist, currently residing in Nashville, TN.

Her imagery springs from her love of Nature and optimistic belief in Beauty.

Her innovative spirit and creative abilities are grounded in the rigorous design training received in Caracas, Venezuela, her childhood homeland, and fine arts training at the Memphis College of Art and the Appalachian Center for the Crafts in Tennessee, and Instituto Allende in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

Over the past ten years, Lisa has taken her mastery of surface desing and her knowledge of traditional art methods into the world of digital production.

Her work continues to express an extraordinary original blend of color, line, form and imagination.

Andrew Saftel
Circle of Days
Acrylic, collage and found objects on panel

Circle of Days conveys a theme that runs through all of my work: how time moves through us as we move through time.  Symbols of time in this painting include the spinning wheel, the clock-like gears, and circles.

 

This painting is part of a large body of work created after my return from a month-long visit to Bangladesh sponsored by a U.S. State Department Visual Arts Initiative.  I wanted to make pieces that would contain the feeling and atmosphere of that lush and vibrant country.  The overall color scheme relates to the brilliant hues and designs of clothing worn by both men and women.  Ceramics, tiles, and ironwork inspired the intricate patterns in this painting, and the plant forms were derived from a beautiful printed sari, a woman’s garment fashioned from six yards of fabric artfully wrapped around the body.  The composition revolves around a clock part that I brought back from Bangladesh, a country where respect for tradition co-exists with the demands of the global economy.

Bob Schatz
Union Station
Archival pigment print

Bob is a commercial photographer based for over 30 years in Nashville, Tennessee.
He specializes in photographing people, lifestyles, products, and architecture for corporate, advertising, and editorial uses in brochures, annual reports, magazines, books, and on the internet.


Bob's stock photography files have over 200,000 images with emphasis in people, lifestyles, business, and americana. Other strong files include travel (southeast, national & international), architecture, and industrial. Bob’s photographs have appeared in several publications including Elle, Forbes, Fortune, National Geographic Traveler, The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, and PC Week. His book, Tennessee Simply Beautiful, offers a tour of the Volunteer State and captures the rich variety of scenery that Tennessee has to offer. Bob has won numerous awards over the years for his fine art prints, which have been exhibited around the country.

Bob Schatz
Oculus, Downtown Presbyterian Chapel Tennessee State Capitol Aaron Douglas Ceiling, Cravath Hall, Fisk University Oculus, Cravath Hall, Fisk University
Archival pigment print

Bob is a commercial photographer based for over 30 years in Nashville, Tennessee. He specializes in photographing people, lifestyles, products, and architecture for corporate, advertising, and editorial uses in brochures, annual reports, magazines, books, and on the internet. Bob's stock photography files have over 200,000 images with emphasis in people, lifestyles, business, and americana. Other strong files include travel (southeast, national & international), architecture, and industrial. Bob’s photographs have appeared in several publications including Elle, Forbes, Fortune, National Geographic Traveler, The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, and PC Week. His book, Tennessee Simply Beautiful, offers a tour of the Volunteer State and captures the rich variety of scenery that Tennessee has to offer. Bob has won numerous awards over the years for his fine art prints, which have been exhibited around the country.

Hans Schmitt-Matzen
Anthology
Acrylic enamel on shaped MDF

Books are objects that we associate simultaneously with both 2D and 3D concepts of space.  Paintings occupy that same mental arena.  The subject matter of books seems very naturally suited toward a lot of the painterly subjects that interest me.  Paintings and books are simultaneously objects and planar screens.  Making shaped paintings always snaps attention back to the objectness of the painting and that is a strategy I employ with this work.

I am also really drawn to libraries.  I love the slower way time seems to pass inside of libraries.  To me they are a lot like churches or museums.  They are contemplative spaces that invite us to find meaning in our lives.  Empty libraries are typically not such exceptional spaces.  Libraries lose most of their power without the objects that they house.  The books of every imaginable hue give the architecture more visual interest and also provide a more substantial and symbolic presence.  The library is always a space of pure potential.  It is also this lovely egalitarian playground where all ideas can compete and be heard.  Very few ideas are excluded from libraries or impossible to come by with a little inquiry.  This inclusiveness that libraries exude really made me want to paint these spine shaped paintings with a full spectrum of colors.  No particular color is emphasized and no particular hue is left out.  It is a palette of potential and not a limited ideal.

Hans Schmitt-Matzen lives and works in Nashville, Tennessee.  Since 2001, his artwork has been featured in numerous national juried exhibitions, museum shows, and art events independent of the gallery system. 


Hans is actively involved in curatorial work and he is a board member of Fugitive Projects, a curatorial collective that organizes exhibitions nationally and internationally. 
Since 2004, Hans has been employed at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, where he currently holds the position of Exhibition Designer.

Michael Clair Sloan
Top of the Narrows
Oil on canvas

I have been drawing and painting since my earliest childhood memories.  After graduating from the Memphis Academy of Arts in 1969, I was fortunate enough to make a living doing what I love.

 

It is my belief that every artist creates his best work when inspired by the things that stir and provoke the inner self.  For me, it has been a kindred spirit with nature, an eternal rebirth that unfolds every spring.  One of those kindred moments happened when I met Melanie, my inspiration for my painting, Top of the Narrows.  Melanie has been a professional picture framer for 30 years, and in the fall of 1994, contacted me in need of a few of my prints for a client.  After our first meeting she was never far from my thoughts.

 

October 16, 1995, Melanie invited me to see a picturesque area of Cheatam County, The Narrows of the Harpeth State Park.  There she took me to the top of the narrows where the Harpeth River folds round the summit, to view the vista I eventually recreated for the Music City Center.  As I worked on the painting it reminded me of how, on that day, I fell in love with her, and how she is a continual rebirth of inspiration for me.  This painting is my tribute to Melanie – “Thank you for being my best friend, my honest critic, and the love of my life.”

Mike Smith
Piney Flats, TN
Archival pigment print

EDUCATION
1981 MFA, Yale University School of Art, New Haven CT
1977 BFA, Massachusetts College of Art, Boston MA

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS
2002
Cumberland Gallery, Nashville TN
Duke University, Center for Documentary Studies, Chapel Hill NC
“New Acquisitions/New Work”, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
“Obsessions”, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco CA

2001
“About Face”, Rena Branston Gallery, San Francisco CA
“Recent Acquisitions”, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland OH
“Picturing Modernity”, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art,
San Francisco CA
“The Alchemy of Light”, Cumberland Gallery, Nashville TN

2000
“You’re Not From Around Here”, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco CA
Carol Ehlers Gallery, Chicago IL
“What’s New”, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Jackson Fine Art Gallery, Atlanta GA

1999
Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York, NY
“Some Southern Stories”, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago IL

FELLOWSHIPS
2001 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship
1994 Tennessee Arts Commission Artist Fellowship

SELECTED COLLECTIONS
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Library of Congress, Washington DC
San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco CA
Houston Museum of Art, Houston TX
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles CA
Tennessee State Museum, Nashville TN

PUBLICATIONS
Wall Street Journal
Sunday New York Times Magazine, cover story
You’re Not From Around Here, Photographs of East Tennessee, Mike Smith, Columbia College, Chicago IL 

Mike Smith
Boone’s Creek, TN
Archival pigment print

EDUCATION
1981 MFA, Yale University School of Art, New Haven CT
1977 BFA, Massachusetts College of Art, Boston MA

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS
2002
Cumberland Gallery, Nashville TN
Duke University, Center for Documentary Studies, Chapel Hill NC
“New Acquisitions/New Work”, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
“Obsessions”, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco CA

2001
“About Face”, Rena Branston Gallery, San Francisco CA
“Recent Acquisitions”, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland OH
“Picturing Modernity”, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art,
San Francisco CA
“The Alchemy of Light”, Cumberland Gallery, Nashville TN

2000
“You’re Not From Around Here”, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco CA
Carol Ehlers Gallery, Chicago IL
“What’s New”, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Jackson Fine Art Gallery, Atlanta GA

1999
Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York, NY
“Some Southern Stories”, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago IL

FELLOWSHIPS
2001 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship
1994 Tennessee Arts Commission Artist Fellowship

SELECTED COLLECTIONS
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Library of Congress, Washington DC
San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco CA
Houston Museum of Art, Houston TX
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles CA
Tennessee State Museum, Nashville TN

PUBLICATIONS
Wall Street Journal
Sunday New York Times Magazine, cover story
You’re Not From Around Here, Photographs of East Tennessee, Mike Smith, Columbia College, Chicago IL 

Suzanne Stryk
Blue Vortex #1 Blue Vortex #2
Acrylic on canvas

My vortex images explore both the natural world and our own personal experience of life.  I’d like to think viewers might wonder whether the swirling forms are opening out or closing in, timeless or transient.  Do the shapes swirl in the process of creation, or the process of dissolving?  Flow up or funnel down?

But as Heraclitus said, “The way up and the way down are one.”

Suzanne Stryk has shown her conceptual nature paintings in solo exhibits throughout the United States, including the Morris Museum of Art (GA), the United States Botanic Garden (DC), The Taubman Museum of Art (VA), and Gallery 180: The Illinois Institute of Art (Chicago).  In 2005 a mid-career survey of the artist’s work, Second Nature: The Art of Suzanne Stryk was organized by the William King Museum, an affiliate of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.  Among the collections that own her work are the Smithsonian (DC), The David Brower Center (Berkeley, CA), The National Academy of Sciences (DC), and the D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson Art Collection (Dundee, Scotland).  She was the recipient of a 2007 George Sugarman Foundation Grant and in 2011 Fellowship from the Virginia Commission for the Arts.  

To learn more about the artist, visit www.suzannestryk.com

Terry Thacker
Bark, Bark, Bark
Oil on canvas

This painting, Bark, Bark, Bark, is a response to the street lights and distant sounds of a late night walk from my studio to home.  The text was meant as a cool, conceptual frame for the romanticized surfaces.

Terry Thacker has been an artist and educator for over twenty-five years, receiving the title of Distinguished Professor in 1985.  He is currently Professor of Fine Art at Watkins College of Art and Design where he was department chair from 2006 to 2011.  Prior academic positions have been, Professor of Art at Savannah College of Art and Design and Associate Professor of Art at Middle Tennessee State University.  Also active as a lecturer and reviewer he has written for Art Papers, lectured at the Southeastern College Art Association, and spoken at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts.

 

Mr. Thacker received his BFA from Austin Peay State University and his MFA from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.  He later studied at Long Island University.  His most recent educational experience was as an associate at the Atlantic Center for the Arts with resident artist Alice Aycock.

 

Mr. Thacker has shown in numerous national and regional exhibitions including exhibitions at the Brooks Museum, Hunter Museum, Dulin Gallery, and Cheekwood as well as solo installations at Vanderbilt University, Western Kentucky University, Murray State University, Alexandria Museum, and the Memphis Center for Contemporary Art.

Herb Williams
Spectrum Cityscape
Crayons and mixed media

The Nashville Skyline took over thirty thousand crayons and 600 man hours to create.  It is the single largest crayon-tip mosaic I have ever undertaken.  It turned out even better than I had hoped so I made my first-ever canvas print of the skyline.  It is half-scale, but the crayons still read extremely well.  You can view and purchase a print through my website www.herbwilliamsart.com, or my gallery at www.therymergallery.com.

Herb Williams was born in Montgomery, AL, in 1973.  Every summer from the age of twelve to graduating from high school at eighteen, he worked in construction, which gave him a deep understanding of form and materials.  Williams received a BFA in sculpture from Birmingham-Southern College, and there apprenticed under two professional sculptors off-campus.  Upon graduation the artist immediately went to work at a bronze foundry in West Palm Beach, FL.  There he cast hundreds of sculptures with the atelier Popliteo and the last work of art by photo realist Duane Hanson, “Man on Riding Lawnmower.”  Williams then moved to Nashville, TN, where he has lived and created art since 1998.  Mr. Williams received The Joan Mitchell Foundation Museum Purchase Grant in 2005, the Next Star Artist Award in 2008, and was sponsored by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in 2011.

Although the artist works with many different mediums and materials, Williams is one of the only individuals in the world with an account with Crayola.  He creates original sculptures out of individual crayons that may require as many as hundreds of thousands.  His artwork hold records with Ripley’s and Guinness.  Williams’ sculptures have been placed in public arenas, such as children’s hospitals, corporate lobbies, museum walls, and the White House.

The press and acclaim the crayon sculptures have garnered has reached as far as China, England, Canada, Belgium, Germany, Australia, Croatia, and Japan.  His work was featured at an Inaugural art exhibit in Washington, DC, with Shepard Fairey, and recently he opened “Plunderland”, a walk-in room installation consisting of almost 500,000 crayons at an art gallery in Chelsea.  Williams just completed a large-scale outdoor installation at the National Ranching Heritage Center in Lubbock, Texas, which dealt with the wildfire devastation, and raising awareness for education, safety, and future planning.  He is currently planning to create a new outdoor sculptural project in Texas and Colorado in 2013 that deal with water conservation, drought, and flooding.  A two-year six-city tour of his artwork throughout China beginning in 2014 is being scheduled now.  Williams is currently represented by The Rymer Gallery in Nashville, TN.

Whitney Wood Bailey
Dualities XXV Intersections XI
Oil and mixed media on canvas

Whitney Wood Bailey’s work is driven by questions of a metaphysical nature such as how design and orchestration within nature affects our consciousness, and how the extraordinary geometries within nature’s design demand the consideration of intelligent design as well as our notions of spirituality.

She combines forms that are organic in creation with carefully placed and predetermined mark making.  The linear hatch marks (“ticking”) in the work, inspired by visits to the ancient art caves of France, represent a form of structure, applied to the naturally occurring elements within this painting process.  The combination of the two suggests the idea of an intersection of faith, reason, instinct and intellect.

Georgia native, Whitney Wood Bailey, received her MFA degree in painting in 2008 from the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta, GA, where she was awarded the Artistic Honors Fellowship for Graduate Study.  She received a BFA degree in painting from Auburn University and studied with the University of Georgia’s Lamar Dodd School of Art in Italy as well as postgraduate study with Rhode Island School of Design in France.  She also studied under painter, Larry Poons, at the Art Students League in New York City.

Whitney has exhibited internationally including Paris, Shanghai and Hong Kong, as well as NYC and around the U.S. 

She completed residencies at the Vermont Studio Center and the Hambidge Center, and was recently a featured artist in New American Paintings, edition #94.
She currently lives and works in New York City.

Lain York
Unknown from Hunting Lodge
Mixed media on panel

Unknown from Hunting Lodge marked a shift in my work, from more figurative elements to landscape.  I think the idea was to convey a sense of an archeological dig-site, an ancient surface that was in transition or was being uncovered.  I like the association of a weathered artifact with an abstract passage; that we may not know exactly what it is that we are looking at, but due to its context (found in the rubble of an imperial hunting lodge or palace,) it may be significant.  It points the way for much of the work I am currently doing.

Lain York is a Nashville-based artist and Nashville native.

Aaron T Stephan
Composition
Painted aluminum

Remembering the molded plastic trees holding parts in model car kits, the artist has produced a life-sized orchestra floating in space and time – at home in a city full of limitless musical opportunities.  The variety of instruments in Composition is reflective of the city’s embracing love of all musical styles, as well as its adaptability and resilience.

 

  • Composition is inspired by Nashville’s rich history as a center of American music acknowledging and engaging the city’s ubiquitous reputation with honor and humor
  • The artwork has 3 distinct views: 1) Exterior from Demonbreun revealing the collective nature of an orchestra; 2) Interior from adjacent balconies framed by the skyline of Nashville; and 3) From below where a landscape of instruments float in space
  • Specifications: 2’ x 19’ x 51’; Polyurethane reinforced with fiberglass strand and hollow aluminum pipe; Each panel weighs 400 lbs.;
  • Individual instrument components molded and cast in studio and assembled on-site
  • Portland, Maine artist

 

Stephan holds a BFA, in sculpture, from SUNY Purchase College and an MFA from Maine College of Art. Recent projects include Percent for Art Projects in Biddeford, ME and on the campus of the University of Southern Maine. He lives and works in Portland.

 

For more information about Aaron T. Stephan:

 

Aaron T. Stephan

142 PEARL STREET

PORTLAND ME 04101

E: A S T E P H A N @ M E C A . E D U

www.aaronstephan.com

 

Phillip K. Smith, III
Chladni
Polycarbonate, stainless steel

Expressive components of music found in harmony, brightness and fluidity are celebrated in Phillip Smith’s wall installation honoring the discovery of “visual sound” by 18th century scientist Ernst Chladni.  Layers of color form bilaterally symmetrical shapes, revealing frequencies of reverberation through sand-covered metal plates.  The overlapping colors found in the celebrated neon signs of Lower Broad and Hatch Show Print provided added inspiration to the artist.

 

  • Viewed from 2 different levels,  artwork measures 4’ x 32’
  • Ernst Chaldni (1756-1827) was first to map sound patterns
  • Smith’s artwork merges the precision and purity of geometry with immeasurable organic qualities of the hand and nature
  • The layering or overprinting process employed by Hatch Show Print in producing letterpress posters influenced the design of the artwork
  • Smith is trained as both an artist and architect
  • Indio, California artist

Phillip K Smith III received his Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design. He continues to push the boundaries and confront the ideas of modernist design. Drawing inspiration from the cold rigidity of the Bauhaus movement, the reductive geometries of minimalism, and the optic sensation of California’s Light and Space movement, Smith III attempts to resolve the complex challenge of finding a natural state of life and spirit within these ideological aesthetic constrictions, the results are deceptively simple and compelling objects that seem to breath and move as you observe and interact with them.

 

For more information about Phillip K Smith III:

 

Artist website: www.pks3.com

Gallery contact: info@royaleprojects.com

 

 

Phillip K. Smith, III
Spectrum II
Acrylic, aluminum, painted MDF

The iconic architecture of Music City Center inspired the creative design of Spectrum II,  a rolling topographic composition of circular disks…similar to music notation, arpeggios of sound, or the finger taps of woodwind or brass instruments. Brushed aluminum disks catch light as they undulate, revealing shifting zones of silver or orange.  Tones and intensities of reflection fluctuate with one’s movement within the space. 

 

  • Viewed from 2 different levels,  artwork measures 4’ x 32’
  • Brushed stainless and acrylic discs constantly change reflecting interior light as one moves around artwork
  • Spectrum II represents both the undulating movement of sound and the MCC roofline
  • Organic element is evident in much of the artist’s work
  • Indio, California artist

Phillip K Smith III received his Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design. He continues to push the boundaries and confront the ideas of modernist design. Drawing inspiration from the cold rigidity of the Bauhaus movement, the reductive geometries of minimalism, and the optic sensation of California’s Light and Space movement, Smith III attempts to resolve the complex challenge of finding a natural state of life and spirit within these ideological aesthetic constrictions, the results are deceptively simple and compelling objects that seem to breath and move as you observe and interact with them.

 

For more information about Phillip K Smith III:

 

Artist website: www.pks3.com

Gallery contact: info@royaleprojects.com

 

 

Alicia Henry
Intimacy and Peace
Mixed Media- Acrylic, clay, dye, fabric, graphite, pen, paper, yarn and thread on canvas

A common and dominant recurring theme in the artist’s work is the human figure – in isolation and the figure interacting with others.  Alicia Henry has crafted twenty-one distinctive panels fused into a single work of art, inviting exploration and conversation of how culture, gender, race and societal differences affect individuals and group interactions.

 

  • At a distance some of the artwork’s panels  appear to be void of texture and color, but closer examine reveals otherwise
  • The artwork is complex in its simplicity and intricate in its execution (painting with thread)
  • The contrast between black and white easily translates into conceptual content
  • Shapes and forms are repeated throughout the artwork
  • 21 panels, each 36” x 36”create an artwork that is 21 ½’ x 9’ 
  • Nashville artist

 

Henry holds a BFA from the School of the Art Institute Chicago and an MFA from Yale University School of Art. Her work has been shown at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Cheekwood Museum of Art, Fisk University, and the Nashville International Airport in addition to the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburg, and the Drawing Center and the Whitney Museum in New York. Henry currently lives in Nashville, TN and is an associate professor at Fisk University.

 

For more information about Alicia Henry:

 

Alicia Henry

108 Morena Street #A1

Nashville, TN 37208

E: ahenry@fisk.edu

http://www.zeitgeist-art.com/artistsMain.asp?artistID=112

 

 

 

Beth Galston
Sound Wave
Aluminum, acrylic, LED lights

Taking inspiration from the five bars of a musical staff and the undulating shape of a sound wave, Beth Galston has created a sculpture in total harmony with the architectural design of Music City Center.   Computer-controlled LED lights dance along serpentine ribbons of suspended metal, suggesting notes that create a visual melody synonomous with the City of Nashville.

 

  • 20 metal pipes, split into 4 groups of 5 pipes each
  • Each group is 20 30 in length
  • The 5 pipes within each group are called staffs
  • The 4 groups are spread within the space hanging 10 30 apart from one another
  • There are 134 LED lights and each light fixture has a low voltage home run to the main control panel
  • LED lights are computer-controlled to vary brightness and the sequence osf illumination creating a visual melody that plays in space and evolves over time
  • Carlisle, Massachusetts artist

Beth Galston is a sculptor who creates immersive environments for interior and exterior spaces. Her site-specific installations use innovative materials, interacting with shadow and light, to explore processes of nature and transformation. Galston was born in Los Angeles and lives in Carlisle, MA. Trained at MIT, she has exhibited her installations nationally. Major public works include: "Color Walk," a sculpture of colored glass for an eightyfoot-

long pedestrian walkway at the Mesa Arts Center, AZ; "Thunderbird Bridge," a

vehicular bridge for an eight lane freeway in Phoenix, AZ; and "Tree/House," an

outdoor architectural sculpture at Socrates Sculpture Park, NYC.

 

For more information about Beth Galston:

 

Beth Galston

218 Stearns Street

Carlisle, MA 01741

E: bethg@bethgalston.com

www.bethgalston.com

 

Bob Zoell
Happy Notes
Custom ceramic tiles

Melodic birds take center stage and fanciful flight across a sweeping landscape mural of Music City, where the song is as significant as the singer. The artist's lifelong  fascination with nature's winged-wonders provides poetic harmony for this delightful and playful celebration of music and the city where it is created.

 

  • Happy Notes is 165’ x 15’ and is 3 times the width of a highway billboard
  • The design of the ceramic mural captures Nashville in four distinct seasons
  • Fabricated from 9,900 6” x 6” custom ceramic gloss tiles
  • Approximately 6 months to apply design and fire the tiles
  • Three weeks to install with three tile artists working 7 days a week
  • The artist has had the cover design of New Yorker magazine on seven different occasions
  • Pasadena, California artist

Bob Zoell’s artwork has been featured in the New Yorker magazine and he has authored and illustrated many children’s books. He has been included in exhibitions throughout the world including the Fundacio Joan Miro, Barcelona and the Center Georges Pompidou, Paris. His artwork is included in the permanent collection of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art.

 

For more information about Bob Zoell:

 

Bob Zoell

468 Atchiston Street

Pasadena, CA 91104

E: bobzoell@earthlink.net

www.bobzoell.com

 

Jamaal B. Sheats
Eight Octaves
Aluminum and enamel paint

Taking inspiration from his hometown, Jamaal Sheats has hammered Nashville’s rich cultural heritage into a series of eight repousse’ metal-relief panels, capturing the life and pulse of Music City.  Eight Octaves forms the shape of a guitar divided into four individual themes: the Rhythm, the Beat, the Pulse, and the Measure, collectively documenting the cultural heartbeat of this metropolitan community.

 

  • Repousse’ is considered by many as an ancient art form of metal relief sculpture consisting of images hammered and shaped on plain sheets of metal
  • The artist was mentored by the highly acclaimed and widely exhibited artist Greg Ridley
  • Eight Octaves is a series of eight aluminum repousse’ panels that form the shape of an abstract guitar
  • Each panel is 8” wide and range in height from 5’ to 7.5 ‘
  • Nashville artist

Sheats holds a BFA from Fisk University and an MFA from School of the Museum of Fine Art Boston-Tufts University. He has had exhibits in New York, Philadelphia, New Orleans, and in Nashville, among other places. Although a Brentwood, TN native, he currently lives in both Nashville, TN and Boston, MA. Sheats works in repousse, in which metal is shaped by hammering on the reverse side to create a design in relief.

 

For more information about Jamaal B. Sheats:

 

Jamaal B. Sheats

P: 615.405.9269

E: jamaalsheats@gmail.com

http://www.jamaalsheats.com/

 

 

 

Ball-Nogues Studio
Euphony
Stainless steel ball chain, steel tube, baked enamel finish

Catenary stainless steel ball chains descend dramatically from a suspended elliptical ring beam and then return skyward on a new path forming two shells of pattern and color.  Artists Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues have produced a translucent three-dimensional painting, fabricated with a digital cutting machine developed in their own studio.  Depending on the viewer's vantage point, the colors 1,141 multi-colored chains of Euphony may blur to a vapor-like visual composition or appear as a hard-edged geometic form.

 

  • Total weight of the artwork (2,100 lbs. ) and ring beam (1,400 lbs.) is 3,500 lbs.
  • Euphony amplifies aesthetics of light, reflection and color creating a visual spectacle and physical sensation in a public space
  • 25 miles of stainless steel chain are attached to a 30’ x 8’  steel ring beam that is suspended 3’ from ceiling
  • Euphony hangs 117’ and 10’ 11” above first level floor

Ball-Nogues Studio is an integrated design and fabrication practice operating in a territory between architecture, art, and industrial design, led by Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues.  Their work is informed by the exploration of craft. Essential to each project is the "design" of the production process itself, with the aim of creating environments that enhance sensation, generate spectacle and invite physical engagement. The Studio has exhibited at major institutions, including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Guggenheim Museum; PS1; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Venice Biennale; the Hong Kong | Shenzhen Biennale; and the Beijing Biennale. They have received numerous honors including three American Institute of Architects Design Awards, United States Artists Target Fellowships and a grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Benjamin and Gaston have taught in the graduate architecture programs at SCI-Arc, UCLA, and USC. Their work has appeared in a variety of publications including The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, Architectural Record, Artforum, Icon, Log, Architectural Digest, Mark and Sculpture.

 

For more information about Ball-Nogues Studio:

 

Ball Nogues Studio

3533 East Olympic Boulevard

Los Angeles, California 90023

P: (213)458-3673

www.ball-nogues.com